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Tuesday, May 5

  1. page home edited ... This article gives a brief analytical overview of the political and intellectual contributions…
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    This article gives a brief analytical overview of the political and intellectual contributions made by the modern civil rights movement as well as those who participated in the movement. It specifically dwells on the actual Civil Rights movement and the imperative role in played in forming a economic, social, and political shift and how that led scholars to reevaluate the social movement.
    Critical Articles
    Synopsis of three critical articles used to research the topic.
    Racial protest, identity, words, and form in Maya Angelou’s I know why the Caged Bird Sings.
    Since emancipation, African Americans have produced “high art” as a strategy to fight their second-class status in racial hierarchies. African American poetry is an important way this was achieved. Literature was an important political tool of struggle within African Americans of the United States. In “Caged Bird” there is a display of literary unity and a significant demonstration on how to fight racism. To ignore the structure and form of how the book was written and solely focus on the content would lead to an ignorance of a huge part of a political work.
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    8:20 am
  2. page home edited ... Critical Articles Synopsis of three critical articles used to research the topic. Racial p…
    ...
    Critical Articles
    Synopsis of three critical articles used to research the topic.
    Racial protest, identity, words, and form in Maya Angelou’s I know why the Caged Bird Sings.
    Since emancipation, African Americans have produced “high art” as a strategy to fight their second-class status in racial hierarchies. African American poetry is an important way this was achieved. Literature was an important political tool of struggle within African Americans of the United States. In “Caged Bird” there is a display of literary unity and a significant demonstration on how to fight racism. To ignore the structure and form of how the book was written and solely focus on the content would lead to an ignorance of a huge part of a political work.
    Formal strategies and structure in the book reveal a sequence of lessons about resisting oppression and shows how Maya goes from a helpless rage and indignation to subtle resistance, and finally to direct and active protest. Juxtaposition, organization, and arrangement of the book play a big role on how the readers are impacted with the information. The book begins where it ends. Cleanliness and raking the yard are around the scene with the white trash girls...leaves us with a hint of connection between the confrontation with the girls and the cleaning of the yard.
    Sweet mama Wanda tells fortunes: An interview with Wanda...
    Wanda Coleman’s poetry and prose are like a direct reflection of our nation. They show what we have ignored, failed to deal with, and deliberately excluded. She is sometimes bitter, sometimes sexually explicit, but always reminds us of how such a powerful and wealthy country has abandoned the most important principles regarding whole generations of its “children.” For over two decades, Coleman has published work which is angry and politically charged. Her literature is about black struggle, feminist rage, and a determination in black women to find dignity and respect despite their deprivation. She writes about the humanity of prostitutes, welfare mothers, handicapped, homeless... (social outcasts). She forces the reader to realize everyone has a part in what is going on in the society.
    Two Writers Who Changed the World.
    Maya Angelou has helped bring about social justice through her writing. Angelou writes of the places she grew up in and the lessons she learned. She wrote about the prejudice and intimidation she faced growing up. She used a powerful voice to change the world. In her “I know why the Caged Bird Sings” she focuses inward; into personal relationships and conflicts, including childhood trauma.
    "each of us has the incredible ability... to be a rainbow in somebody's cloud. It's amazing."
    She gave her readers a clear picture of racism, discrimination, and injustice.

    Popular Culture
    {a_brhistory_0216.jpg} {i_timelogo.gif}
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Monday, May 4

  1. page home edited ... WC: Other than the Bill of Rights? The most important law for African-Americans has not yet be…
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    WC: Other than the Bill of Rights? The most important law for African-Americans has not yet been written or passed through Congress.
    JJ: How do you think our laws are shaped by race?
    ...
    negative circumstances.
    Primary Texts
    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou)
    ...
    References
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1877380,00.html
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,947825,00.html
    Walker, Pierre A. "Racial protest, identity, words, and form in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." College Literature 22.3 (Oct. 1995): 91. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill Library, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=9512101145&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.
    Sparks, Leah J. "Racism in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings/Racism in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird." School Library Journal 54.4 (Apr. 2008): 164-164. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill Library, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=31581019&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.
    St. John, Janet. "The Riot Inside Me: More Trials & Tremors (Book)." Booklist 101.18 (15 May 2005): 1629-1629. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill Library, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=17244507&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,947825,00.htmhttp://www.answers.com/topic/wanda-coleman
    http://www.poemhunter.com/maya-angelou/
    http://www.nathanielturner.com/wandacolemanslam.htm

    Magistrale, Tony, and Patricia Ferreira.. "Sweet mama Wanda tells fortunes: An interview with Wanda ..." Black American Literature Forum 24.3 (Fall90 1990): 491. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=9710142877&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.
    ...
    May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=2373060&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.//<http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=2373060&site=ehost-live&scope=site>. 25
    1 (Aug. 1999): 517.
    Sparks, Leah J. "Racism in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings/Racism in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird." School Library Journal 54.4 (Apr. 2008): 164-164. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill Library, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=31581019&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.
    St. John, Janet. "The Riot Inside Me: More Trials & Tremors (Book)." Booklist 101.18 (15 May 2005): 1629-1629. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill Library, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=17244507&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.
    Walker, Pierre A. "Racial protest, identity, words, and form in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." College Literature 22.3 (Oct. 1995): 91. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [DH Hill Library, NCSU], [Raleigh], [NC]. 1 May 2009 <http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/cgi-bin/proxy.pl?server=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=9512101145&site=ehost-live&scope=site>.//

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    3:07 pm
  2. page home edited ... Primary Texts I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou) 2nd Primary Text Here Represe…
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    Primary Texts
    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou)
    2nd Primary Text HereRepresents her confinement resulting from racism and oppression
    About the first 17 years of her life
    A Riot Inside Me (Wanda Coleman)
    About the "bloody crossroads between art and politics"

    Critical Responses -
    Racial protest, identity, words, and form in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings:
    ...
    A RETROSPECTIVE ON THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT: Political and Intellectual Landmarks:
    This article gives a brief analytical overview of the political and intellectual contributions made by the modern civil rights movement as well as those who participated in the movement. It specifically dwells on the actual Civil Rights movement and the imperative role in played in forming a economic, social, and political shift and how that led scholars to reevaluate the social movement.
    Critical Articles
    Synopsis of three critical articles used to research the topic.
    Popular Culture
    (view changes)
    3:00 pm
  3. page home edited ... magazine editor assistant recruiter ... Our Lives and NBC television Her parents encou…
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    magazine editor
    assistant recruiter
    ...
    Our Lives and NBC television
    Her parents encouraged her writing during childhood and she was also influenced by many other well-known authors:
    Edgar Allan Poe
    ...
    Hard Dance (1993)
    She has received a lot of recognition and success for her work
    ...
    An Emmy for best daytime drama, Days of Our Lives
    1981-1982: A National Endowment for the Arts grant
    1984: Guggenheim Fellowship for poetry
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    2:39 pm
  4. page home edited ... {coleman.jpg} Born Wanda Evans November 13, 1946 in Los Angeles, California Her father was…
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    {coleman.jpg}
    Born Wanda Evans November 13, 1946 in Los Angeles, California
    Her father was an ex-boxer and she grew up poor
    Identifies herself as the "L.A. poet"
    She grew up in L.A., California and has used it has the primary setting for many of her political writings
    ...
    the primary voice of her novels is an "African American Woman whose head is bloodied and but unbowed, who is just as tough as as the harsh city in which she lives"
    She published many poems by the time she was 15
    She has had a wide variety of careers throughout her life,jobs on her way to becoming a professional writer, the careers listed below are not limited to the following:her careers
    Peace Corps/vistaCorps/Vista
    production editor
    proofreader
    magazine editor

    waitress
    magazine editor
    assistant recruiter
    astaff writer for
    ...
    Our Lives in 1976
    NBC television

    Her parents encouraged her writing during childhood and she was also influenced by many other well-known authors:
    Edgar Allan Poe
    ...
    1984: Guggenheim Fellowship for poetry
    1998: won the Lenore
    Her controversy between with the Angelou Review
    Wanda wrote an "acid" review
    controversial critique of Maya
    ...
    A Song FlownFlung Up to
    ...

    She said "Unfortunately, the Maya Angelou of A Song Flown Up to Heaven seemsthat it "seems small and
    ...
    up to heaven all right,heaven, but it's
    ...
    a song."
    She

    She also
    accused Maya
    ...
    book full "of emptyof "empty phrases and
    ...
    generalities...dead metaphors ("sober("sobbing embrace," "my
    ...
    clumsy smiles (like("like the sound
    ...
    rutting times")"
    She was banned from a bookstore that had scheduled a poetry reading

    Interview
    with Wanda Coleman about her
    Interview:
    political and literary life:
    JJ: How did your childhood affect your writings?
    WC: First, being raised in the “deep west” of the 1950s, and in an environment where the nasties of racism were considerably less obvious, caused me to believe—early on—that I was equal to and as privileged as any of my Caucasian classmates. I did not know about Black music. (I talk about this in an essay on music in The Riot Inside Me.) I was also raised free of the subsumed self-hated (and idiomatic speech) that I would later discover is a part of the psyche of many of my African-American peers. I lived in a White world. And when I began to discover what it meant to be Black, it was as though I were thrown into a dungeon, emotionally and psychologically. (However, Black music was a promise of liberation.) As I matured, I learned to reverse many of those negatives by putting them to work in my poetry and prose—the stories and the idiomatic speech.
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    2:35 pm
  5. page home edited ... Her controversy between with the Angelou Review Wanda wrote an "acid" review of May…
    ...
    Her controversy between with the Angelou Review
    Wanda wrote an "acid" review of Maya Angelou's A Song Flown Up to Heaven (2002)
    She said "Unfortunately, the Maya Angelou of A Song Flown Up to Heaven seems small and inauthentic, without ideas, wisdom or vision. Something is being flung up to heaven all right, but it's not a song."
    She accused Maya of writing a book full "of empty phrases and sweeping generalities...dead metaphors ("sober embrace," "my heart fell in my chest") and clumsy smiles (like the sound of buffaloes running into each other at rutting times")"

    She was banned from a bookstore that had scheduled a poetry reading with her
    Interview:
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    2:25 pm
  6. page home edited ... {coleman.jpg} Born Wanda Evans November 13, 1946 in Los Angeles, California Her father was…
    ...
    {coleman.jpg}
    Born Wanda Evans November 13, 1946 in Los Angeles, California
    Her father was an ex-boxer and she grew up poor
    Identifies herself as the "L.A. poet"
    She grew up in L.A., California and has used it has the primary setting for many of her political writings
    ...
    the primary voice of her novels is an "African American Woman whose head is bloodied and but unbowed, who is just as tough as as the harsh city in which she lives"
    She published many poems by the time she was 15
    WandaShe has been married/divorced twice until she married Austin Straus
    She has 3 children:
    Anthony
    Tunisia
    Ian Wayne Grant
    had a variety of careers throughout her life, her careers are not limited to the following:
    Peace Corps/vista
    production editor
    proofreader
    magazine editor
    waitress
    assistant recruiter
    a writer for Days of Our Lives in 1976
    NBC television

    Her parents encouraged her writing during childhood and she was also influenced by many other well-known authors:
    Edgar Allan Poe
    ...
    1984: Guggenheim Fellowship for poetry
    1998: won the Lenore
    Her controversy between with the Angelou Review
    Wanda wrote an "acid" review of Maya Angelou's A Song Flown Up to Heaven (2002)
    She was banned from a bookstore that had scheduled a poetry reading with her

    Interview:
    JJ: How did your childhood affect your writings?
    (view changes)
    2:15 pm
  7. page home edited ... the primary voice of her novels is an "African American Woman whose head is bloodied and …
    ...
    the primary voice of her novels is an "African American Woman whose head is bloodied and but unbowed, who is just as tough as as the harsh city in which she lives"
    She published many poems by the time she was 15
    Wanda has been married/divorced twice until she married Austin Straus
    She has 3 children:
    Anthony
    Tunisia
    Ian Wayne Grant

    Her parents encouraged her writing during childhood and she was also influenced by many other well-known authors:
    Edgar Allan Poe
    (view changes)
    2:05 pm
  8. page home edited ... Heavy Daughter: Poems and Stories (1991) Hard Dance (1993) Interview: She has received a …
    ...
    Heavy Daughter: Poems and Stories (1991)
    Hard Dance (1993)
    Interview: She has received a lot of recognition and success for her work
    1976: An Emmy
    1981-1982: A National Endowment for the Arts grant
    1984: Guggenheim Fellowship for poetry
    1998: won the Lenore
    Interview:

    JJ: How did your childhood affect your writings?
    WC: First, being raised in the “deep west” of the 1950s, and in an environment where the nasties of racism were considerably less obvious, caused me to believe—early on—that I was equal to and as privileged as any of my Caucasian classmates. I did not know about Black music. (I talk about this in an essay on music in The Riot Inside Me.) I was also raised free of the subsumed self-hated (and idiomatic speech) that I would later discover is a part of the psyche of many of my African-American peers. I lived in a White world. And when I began to discover what it meant to be Black, it was as though I were thrown into a dungeon, emotionally and psychologically. (However, Black music was a promise of liberation.) As I matured, I learned to reverse many of those negatives by putting them to work in my poetry and prose—the stories and the idiomatic speech.
    (view changes)
    1:56 pm

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